EBSQ Spotlight on Portraits & Figurative Art: Theresa Bayer

This month’s featured gallery is Portraits & Figurative Art. Portraits are the artistic representation of an individual or individuals with the face as the focus. The term “figurative art” most frequently refers to the representational depiction of a human or animal figure. Often they are deeply personal – either to the artist, because of the emotions being expressed by the subject or because of the emotions these works elicit from us. They delight, disturb and connect us. During the month of May, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ artists that create some of these evocative pieces of art.

Theresa Bayer

Wisdom Incorporated - Theresa Bayer

My paintings feature dreamlike scenes of mysterious people, animals, and landscapes and have a storybook quality to them. Symbols inspire me, because they compress complex ideas and philosophies into immediately accessible images. I love portraying the figure and seeing how many different ways it can fit into a fantastic scene. I attend figure drawing and figure painting sessions to get a fix on the realism, and then invent surroundings. – Theresa Bayer

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EBSQ Spotlight on Portraits & Figurative Art: Pat DeVane Burns

This month’s featured gallery is Portraits & Figurative Art. Portraits are the artistic representation of an individual or individuals with the face as the focus. The term “figurative art” most frequently refers to the representational depiction of a human or animal figure. Often they are deeply personal – either to the artist, because of the emotions being expressed by the subject or because of the emotions these works elicit from us. They delight, disturb and connect us. During the month of May, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ artists that create some of these evocative pieces of art.

Pat DeVane Burns

One Down, Two To Go - Pat DeVane Burns

What is so intriguing to me about forms and faces, be it person or animal, is that each one is an individual… alike in so many ways, but different.  It is my challenge as the artist to see what is unique about the body language, the nuance of expression, the coloration, the personality and to translate what might be considered intangible into a tangible painting of that individual. – Pat DeVane Burns

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EBSQ Spotlight on Digital Art: PQ Ribber

This month’s featured gallery is Digital Art. Digital Art is not defined by one genre or style but rather the means used to create it. With the advance of digital tools and software, anything is possible. Like any medium, Digital Art requires the talent, patience, skill, and creativity of the artist to come alive. Digital Art is limited only by the imagination (and skill) of the artist. This month we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of EBSQ’s Digital artists.

PQ Ribber

Among - PQ Ribber

The medium of digital has opened up whole new possibilities for me and my art. I’ve always wanted to do collages of classic, old, imagery. Digital has allowed me to ‘gut’ the best of old illustration/advertising/Victorian trade cards and other materials that previously were not the sort of thing one would take a scissors to. It is paint without paint, light in the darkness, halls of mirrors and worlds of magic. The other amazing thing about digital is that it ‘democratises’ art – everyone can have a copy that is every bit as ‘good’ as anyone else’s. Art is meant to be seen and appreciated (hopefully), after all. – PQ Ribber

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EBSQ Spotlight on Digital Art: Deanne Flouton

This month’s featured gallery is Digital Art. Digital Art is not defined by one genre or style but rather the means used to create it. With the advance of digital tools and software, anything is possible. Like any medium, Digital Art requires the talent, patience, skill, and creativity of the artist to come alive. Digital Art is limited only by the imagination (and skill) of the artist. This month we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of EBSQ’s Digital artists.

Deanne Flouton

Sail Away - Deanne Flouton

First of all, I love digital art because it allows me to take my art in myriad directions, based on what constantly emerges as I work. Digital art has allowed me to see the world through my own rose colored glasses. I enjoy the fact that I can do detailed editing by adjusting hundreds of different parameters that affect the look and feel of the digital paint tool and the final result.

I was always frustrated with the desire to be able to paint well, but was never happy with the results. Then traditional (analog) photography satisfied my artistic curiosity for many years, until digital photography came along. A digital camera opened up a whole new world for me in conjunction with Photoshop. But somehow that did not seem enough. I wanted more, to be able to create more than what Photoshop or other paint programs offered. A review of Studio Artist sparked my interest and I immediately began working with an early version of this very sophisticated software whose learning curve (huge!!) frustrated me even more. However, I persisted and over the years have tweaked my art to suit my needs and visual aesthetic. The software is constantly evolving and I continue to learn but have not yet mastered all the technical aspects that I would like to due to the complexity of the software.

My work may be rendered as realistic or abstracted output, often times having no direct relationship to the content of the original source image. It is creativity ‘on the fly’ at times, and can result in a happy accident or a meticulously planned outcome. Its possibilities are endless, which makes it so exciting to work with. Guided by the image and imagination it is the magic of the transformation that inspires me at every step. Many versions of the same source image can be rendered, making it difficult to settle on one or more ‘best’ versions as keepers.

What I find compelling about this form is that Digital Art differs from Traditional Art, but because of technology and sophisticated digital brushes, Traditional Art can be emulated through brushes and other software tools which apply oil, acrylic, pastel or pencil “paint strokes” to the digital canvas. These are tools just as a brush, palette knife or pencil is to a traditional artist. It is the skill and vision of the artist that makes the art.

To sum it up my digital art is the creation of an image which reflects my vision through an organized and/or spontaneous process which evolves at its own pace. It is my personal interpretation realized through modification, and/or enhancement of a photograph. My original photographs are used as a point of departure for creation, taking creativity to the next level as an extension of the original photo. It is what keeps me going and on an even keel. – Deanne Flouton

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EBSQ Spotlight on Digital Art: Kevin Wells

This month’s featured gallery is Digital Art. Digital Art is not defined by one genre or style but rather the means used to create it. With the advance of digital tools and software, anything is possible. Like any medium, Digital Art requires the talent, patience, skill, and creativity of the artist to come alive. Digital Art is limited only by the imagination (and skill) of the artist. This month we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of EBSQ’s Digital artists.

Kevin Wells

Bomber #2 Kevin Wells

The art I’ve made in digital mediums is creating collages with my photographs in Photoshop by taking each photo and manipulating them, sometimes radically, changing the hues, cropping, etc., and layering them within a composition as transparencies. Also adding line art that I’ve scanned and again manipulated to get the colors and effects i want. Finally “painting” on the piece with Photoshop’s airbrush and paint software that’s built-in. It’s a technique i discovered in college that i became comfortable with because of the total freedom it allows. It naturally turned me toward these modern graphic pop Robert Rauschenberg type of images because that what hit me when i first discovered Photoshop. Earlier than this, on Microsoft Paint, standard on all PC’s, I began literally drawing or painting with the program much the same way I would do an oil painting, with an underpainting, and then building it up in blocks of color and using the “airbrush” tool to soften edges in certain places. When you say “Digital Art”, you’re really describing art made with computer software and photography, where said software is just another tool or medium, the same as oil paints or pastels. – Kevin Wells

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EBSQ Spotlight on Digital Art: Carolyn Schiffhouer

This month’s featured gallery is Digital Art. Digital Art is not defined by one genre or style but rather the means used to create it. With the advance of digital tools and software, anything is possible. Like any medium, Digital Art requires the talent, patience, skill, and creativity of the artist to come alive. Digital Art is limited only by the imagination (and skill) of the artist. This month we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of EBSQ’s Digital artists.

Carolyn Schiffhouer

Red Tulip - Carolyn Schiffhouer
I was drawn to digital art by the challenge of creating art using a computer.  To be able to wrestle with the limitations of the technology and come out successful is the greatest fun to me.  I love taking an image and seeing just what can be done to it using the computer.  It is exciting fun to experiment and see  what happens when you do this or that to a bare photo or scanned image. It is a total experience to take an idea, find an image that might work and create something new within the boundaries of the computer.  The challenge of creation and the beauty of a final image drew me to digital art and keeps me exploring and exploring. – Carolyn Schiffhouer

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EBSQ Spotlight on Digital Art: Ruth J. Jamieson

This month’s featured gallery is Digital Art. Digital Art is not defined by one genre or style but rather the means used to create it. With the advance of digital tools and software, anything is possible. Like any medium, Digital Art requires the talent, patience, skill, and creativity of the artist to come alive. Digital Art is limited only by the imagination (and skill) of the artist. This month we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of EBSQ’s Digital artists.

Ruth J. Jamieson

Casting A Spell Of Death - Ruth J. Jamieson

Digital art is a recent addition to my creative repertoire, and my process is exploratory and sometimes experimental. In 2007 I discovered Print on Demand sites and as I prepared images of my paintings and pottery to be printed onto cards, mouse pads, mugs and other items I experimented with graphics software and all the wonderful things I could do with it. I create composite digital images using many various components, including fractal images.

I admired the ethereal beauty of the Fractal images that one my colleagues created and she introduced me to Apophysis, an open source program which generates random images based on mathematical formulas, which are called ‘flames’. These flames are swirls or sprays of colour. Using the software interface I change the mathematical formula and the image. Colourways and backgrounds can be changed and doing so can radically change the image by changing light values. The random abstract patterns and delicate quality of Apophysis fractals entrance me. I manipulate the flames until I create a representative image that pleases me. Each flame is a gift waiting for me to reveal what it contains. – Ruth J. Jamieson

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