EBSQ Spotlight on Photography: Colour: Richard Holland

This month’s featured gallery is Photography: Colour. Photography lets us briefly stop time and capture tangible moments. Whether spontaneous or crafted, what our eyes see is frozen forever. When the photograph is in colour, we will always have the blue of the sky, the flush of a cheek, and every colour the world presents us. During the month of June, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ photographers that enjoy capturing the world in colour.

Richard Holland

Age - Richard Holland

I became interested in photography when I was about 16 years old…got my first SLR as a high school graduation present from my parents. Much to their dismay I spent the better part of my college years in the photo lab.   I spent a couple of years learning the silver process (B&W) and developing a personal gum bichromate process (water colors) before moving on to color (long before the digital age).

I call myself a social landscape photographer, which is like photojournalism without the paycheck.  I like to capture the truth in a person’s eyes, something they prefer you wouldn’t see; a soft spot.  It’s there for a moment unguarded then jumps back behind the wall.   I also enjoy performance photography: music, dance, sports. Nature is also a big draw.  Stopping time in the flight of a bird or a bee.  Enjoying the bloom of a flower.  Helping others be moved by things they otherwise might not.

I feel color photography deals with reality.  Black and white by its very nature manipulates the moment.  I love both. – Richard Holland

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EBSQ Spotlight on Photography: Colour: Lisa Miller

This month’s featured gallery is Photography: Colour. Photography lets us briefly stop time and capture tangible moments. Whether spontaneous or crafted, what our eyes see is frozen forever. When the photograph is in colour, we will always have the blue of the sky, the flush of a cheek, and every colour the world presents us. During the month of June, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ photographers that enjoy capturing the world in colour.

Lisa Miller

The Light Shines Through - Lisa Miller

Color photography gives an opportunity to record what is seen. A memory made with the snap of the shutter. Through a photo, a photographer can show the world what and how they see. From broad landscapes to the smallest macro, life is what is captured. Once a photographer understands light and color the possibilities are endless, exciting and rewarding. Capturing life it is my passion. – Lisa Miller

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EBSQ Spotlight on Photography: Colour: Leea Baltes

This month’s featured gallery is Photography: Colour. Photography lets us briefly stop time and capture tangible moments. Whether spontaneous or crafted, what our eyes see is frozen forever. When the photograph is in colour, we will always have the blue of the sky, the flush of a cheek, and every colour the world presents us. During the month of June, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ photographers that enjoy capturing the world in colour.

Leea Baltes

Afternoon Stroll - Leea Baltes

I feel that the colors that surround us, in the different seasons, in the heavens and throughout the entire universe is a wonderful and gracious gift from God. I was captivated by the colors in nature as a very young child and to this day I can close my eyes and still see the beautiful bouquet of lilacs that I took to my first grade teacher. Or the brilliant yellow leaves of the maple tree against a bright blue autumn sky. Summer is my favorite season because of all the shades of green and all of the beautiful flowers. I am reminded of the song “What A Wonderful World”. What a wonderful gift from above! – Leea Baltes

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EBSQ Spotlight on Photography: Colour: W. Kevin Murray

This month’s featured gallery is Photography: Colour. Photography lets us briefly stop time and capture tangible moments. Whether spontaneous or crafted, what our eyes see is frozen forever. When the photograph is in colour, we will always have the blue of the sky, the flush of a cheek, and every colour the world presents us. During the month of June, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ photographers that enjoy capturing the world in colour.

W. Kevin Murray

Bumble's Shadow - W. Kevin Murrary

The seasons of  Spring, Summer and especially Fall scream to be captured in color. While Winter respectfully requests it’s long, contrasting shadows be photographed in monochrome. The vast majority of the year, outdoor photographers like myself yearn for at least 64 individual colors with a handy crayon sharpener built into the back. For film photographers the year started out on a sad note, the end of Kodachrome, you gave us those nice bright colors, those greens of Summer… but, new this year, along comes Kodak Ektar 100 and color film is rejuvenated. At the present I mostly shoot digital, with digital the amount of control the photographer has over the image is nothing less than inspirational! Along with that, new and improved imaging software arrives on the shelves before I have time to familiarize myself with the latest and fastest that I just downloaded six months ago. True Photography’s learning curve has never been steeper on the one hand, but on the other “point and shoot”  may have muddied the waters a bit, the difference between a picture and a photograph… as always, in the eye of the beholder? – W. Kevin Murray

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EBSQ Spotlight on Portraits & Figurative Art: Sandy Farley

This month’s featured gallery is Portraits & Figurative Art. Portraits are the artistic representation of an individual or individuals with the face as the focus. The term “figurative art” most frequently refers to the representational depiction of a human or animal figure. Often they are deeply personal – either to the artist, because of the emotions being expressed by the subject or because of the emotions these works elicit from us. They delight, disturb and connect us. During the month of May, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ artists that create some of these evocative pieces of art.

Sandy Farley

Hee-Haw - Sandy Farley

Animals have very rich social and emotional lives.  Their capacity for empathy, their delight in play: these are the very things that we first seek out in them when we wish to bond with or understand them.  I often take my artwork to middle ground between animal and human — a place where characteristics of both are blended, and perhaps a bit of humor is added to sweeten the mix.  My human and animal portraits share these traits. – Sandy Farley

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EBSQ Spotlight on Portraits & Figurative Art: Mark Satchwill

This month’s featured gallery is Portraits & Figurative Art. Portraits are the artistic representation of an individual or individuals with the face as the focus. The term “figurative art” most frequently refers to the representational depiction of a human or animal figure. Often they are deeply personal – either to the artist, because of the emotions being expressed by the subject or because of the emotions these works elicit from us. They delight, disturb and connect us. During the month of May, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ artists that create some of these evocative pieces of art.

Mark Satchwill

Nan - Mark Satchwill

People, especially portraits, are my favourite subject matter. The human face is an amazing thing – every one unique and beautiful in its own way, the window to the character of the soul behind it. The challenge of capturing not just the superficial likeness, but a glimpse into the heart of the subject, is what excites and fascinates me. All the subtle nuances, the muscles at the corners of the mouth, the eyes, the tilt of the head, all can be used to convey meaning and expression and what it is to be human. – Mark Satchwill

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EBSQ Spotlight on Portraits & Figurative Art: Leola Walker

This month’s featured gallery is Portraits & Figurative Art. Portraits are the artistic representation of an individual or individuals with the face as the focus. The term “figurative art” most frequently refers to the representational depiction of a human or animal figure. Often they are deeply personal – either to the artist, because of the emotions being expressed by the subject or because of the emotions these works elicit from us. They delight, disturb and connect us. During the month of May, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ artists that create some of these evocative pieces of art.

Leola Walker

Drinking Water - Leola Walker

What inspires me when I paint figures – motion that shows or causes emotion. From the innocent joy on my grandchildren’s faces while playing in the backyard, or the sway of the sari as women carry water above their heads, to the raw brute emotion of beast and cowboy at the rodeo. All tickle your senses and hopefully provoke thought about the scene. Can you almost hear the laughter of the children? Hear the singing? Or smell the sweat and hear the grunts at the rodeo? Because I paint mainly in miniature I have to try and create this on a very limited space. It’s a challenging and fun process. – Leola Walker

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