EBSQ Blogger of the Week: Brenda Boylan

This week’s EBSQ Blogger is a pastel artist who’s not afraid to take her art on the road. You might find her on a street corner, a city park or even out in the countryside. Her pastel paintings are vibrant, colorful impressions of the beauty all around us.

Who and where are you?

Hi!  I’m Brenda Boylan (also known as “Lil’ b”, by my closest friend).  Painting with soft pastels in the studio or en plein-air is what I LOVE to do!  I’ve been painting professionally for 16 years and am a member of the Northwest Pastel Society and a few other regional organizations.  I have won a few awards with my work and more recently my work was published in the Best of America Pastel II Series.

I’m also married to the man of my dreams and a mom of two very busy kids, so you could say I’m pretty fulfilled.  I live in the Great Northwest, Portland, Oregon, where tree huggers and salmon run free.  This region offers artists a lot of beautiful areas to gain inspiration from.

Albrights Donuts, 12x9 inches, Pastel

How did you get started art blogging?

I started blogging mostly out of curiosity.  Visiting my favorite artists’ websites, (some from EBSQ) I noticed that a lot of them had really cool blogs which kept me coming back for more. From their example, I figured out how and what I would blog about.  Also, I was told that Blogging is a simple way to market my work to a wider market and that I can easily build relationships with my visitors.  Sounded easy to me!  So I jumped right in, and have been posting weekly since September of ’07.  Blogging keeps me accountable to my art and motivates me to paint on a regular basis which can sometimes be hard with my busy life.

Rise From Water, 5x5 inches, Pastel

Any tips for other EBSQ art bloggers?

Keep it simple and have interesting things to write about that others may learn from.  Also, post regularly!  I have found bloggers who don’t post regularly don’t give me any reason to return.

Being Sour Has it's Benefits, 6x6 inches, Pastel

What’s your musical inspiration of choice when you’re working in your studio?

I love to listen to a lot of different stuff.  Currently, I use Pandora.com and have created a “station” I mixed with 80 punk/new wave music as well as the other side of the spectrum of Classical and new age instrumental sounds.  More recently, the background sounds of jazz are beginning to appeal to me more and more.

Buoy Dance, 18x12 inches, Pastel

What’s coming next from your easel?

I’m getting ready to create a larger version of a study I did last November ’09, called “Evening Reflections“.  I have been working on a series of 24×24” scenes of my family’s farm, but have moved beyond that idea to include other property lines filled with moody color. This one study is just what I’d like to make on a larger scale.  Sometimes a study doesn’t translate into a larger piece, so I will be trying to capture the mood more than the exact likeness of the study.

http://brendaboylan.blogspot.com/

Thank you Brenda for being an EBSQ Blogger of the Week!

If you are an EBSQ Artist and would like to be considered for Blogger of the Week just add us to your blogroll. I’m searching EBSQ profiles weekly for links to artist’s blogs. If you aren’t an EBSQ Artist, what are you waiting for?

Join Today!

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EBSQ Spotlight on Still Life: Kari Tirrell

This month’s featured gallery is Still Life. A still life is a collection of inanimate objects depicted in an artistic composition and is a genre that has always been a staple for artists. Setting up a still life is an exercise in composition. Painting or photographing the composition is an exercise in technique. The result of these efforts is a work of art. Throughout the month of January, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of EBSQ’s still life artists.

Kari Tirrell

Sweet Things - Kari Tirrell

I find the still life genre intriguing for many reasons.  I like that I can open my refrigerator, utensil drawer, or cupboard and find something interesting to paint; any ordinary object can be made extraordinary.  I love still life paintings that show textures: metal, wood, glass, paper, cloth, etc., particularly if these textures are somehow layered.  I enjoy the play of light; the way it might bounce off of one object, but sink into another.  I like paintings that look uncontrived, with interesting viewpoints and crops.  The challenge of employing these elements to create a successful painting is what compels me to paint still life. – Kari Tirrell

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EBSQ Spotlight on Still Life: Colleen Brown

This month’s featured gallery is Still Life. A still life is a collection of inanimate objects depicted in an artistic composition and is a genre that has always been a staple for artists. Setting up a still life is an exercise in composition. Painting or photographing the composition is an exercise in technique. The result of these efforts is a work of art. Throughout the month of January, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of EBSQ’s still life artists.

Colleen Brown

Oranges Too - Colleen Brown

In the early years of my art career I didn’t paint still life, I painted landscapes and people.  My attraction to still life came about initially through geographic relocation and enforced confinement to my house due to extreme weather conditions.  The people in my house were also not willing to sit still as long as a piece of fruit, a vase of flowers or a teacup and saucer.  Further, I love the absolute control I have over elements such as lighting, cast shadows, colour palette and textures.  My current works in still life are largely representational and aesthetic rather than delivering symbolic messages about material decay and the futility of worldly life exhibited by 17th century Vanitas or Memento Mori paintings.  Although, I find that as I continue to grow in my art, I am looking to incorporate more meaning and gesture rather than merely making pretty paintings.  I try to live a simple life, but endeavour to share my vision with others of how the simple, everyday things we take for granted can also become the beautiful. – Colleen Brown

Like what you see here?  We hope you’ll consider leaving a comment or subscribing to one of our feeds. Never miss another cool post from EBSQ. Subscribe to EBSQ: Art Meets Blog v2.0 by Email today!

EBSQ Blogger of the Week: Kari Tirrell

Welcome to EBSQ’s first Blogger of the Week! I’m excited to start things off with an award winning, juried member of EBSQ. This self-taught pastel artist, with a love for realism, has been blogging since 2008. Her stunning creations never cease to amaze!

Who and where are you?

I’m Kari Tirrell, and I live in Gig Harbor, WA.

Sweet, 2009, Soft Pastel on La Carte

How did you get started art blogging?

Someone posted an article about why artists should blog on the EBSQ forum, and that started me thinking about it.  I didn’t want to blog.  I didn’t want to add another thing to my “to do” list.  But I did it anyway, and I’m glad I did.  I certainly didn’t expect to enjoy it so much.

New Hat, 2008, Soft Pastel on Velour Paper

Any tips for other EBSQ art bloggers?

1. Plan your blog posts with your audience (and search engines) in mind. One of the things I like best about blogging is that it makes the artist accessible.  I enjoy blogs where I can read the artist’s thoughts about what they’ve created, see their process, and interact with them through comments or email.  I assume that the readers of my blog are similarly interested, and try to write my blog posts accordingly.  It is also important to keep in mind that search engines need keywords.  If you want people to find your blog, include relevant keywords in your posts.  Simply posting a picture of your work with the title and dimensions is not only less satisfying for the viewer, it will also do very little to help the search engines find you.

2.  Follow the blogs of artists you admire, and leave thoughtful comments on their work.  The value of interacting with other artists is a benefit of blogging which should not be underestimated.

Lunch Break, 2009, Soft Pastels on Suede Matboard

What’s your musical inspiration of choice when you’re working in your studio?

My taste in music is somewhat eclectic, and I listen to whatever strikes my mood at the moment.  I have satellite radio in my studio now, which I’m really enjoying because I can listen to a wide variety of music.  When I want my old favorites, I pull out my MP3.

Sunny Spot, 2009, Soft Pastels on Suede Matboard

What’s coming next from your easel?

I have my next ten paintings planned; mostly figurative works, but I’m going to throw a couple of other things into the mix as well.  Visit my blog to find out!

http://karitirrell.blogspot.com/

Thank you Kari for the being the first EBSQ Blogger of the Week!

If you are an EBSQ Artist and would like to be considered for Blogger of the Week just add us to your blogroll. I’m searching EBSQ profiles weekly for links to artist’s blogs. If you aren’t an EBSQ Artist, what are you waiting for?

Join Today!

EBSQ Spotlight on Artistic Nudes: Melissa Tobia

This month’s featured gallery is Artistic Nudes. The nude is a classic subject for artists and is of endless fascination and challenge. There are many types of nudes, in all degrees of undress and all manner of poses. Some are intended to make a statement, some are part of a story and some are just a celebration of the human form.

Melissa Tobia

Woman Laying On Red Pillow - Melissa Tobia

I find drawing nudes to be one of the hardest tests of skill as an artist. When I draw a nude, it tests my technique, my sight, and my ability to bring out the subject’s personality. A nude drawing shows the subject’s vulnerabilities, their soul, their character and personality and also how the artist views them. Every human being has a story that we can all connect to, and the artist must be able to show that story. It is important to me as an artist to be able to capture the intensity of emotions and feelings of the subject as it is to capture the subject’s likeness. There is such a beauty in the human form and its anatomy; more so, when you can also see and feel the vulnerabilities that all human beings share. – Melissa Tobia

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Winner announced in Simon Sez… Halloween!

This week’s Simon Sez challenge winner is Patricia Lee Christensen. Harlan – this week’s Simon, chose Halloween as her them. She had something to say about all the entries and wished she could have chosen them all, but ultimately, she decided to “pass the baton” to Patricia.

First Pumpkin - Patricia Lee Christensen

 

 

If you want keep up with Simon Sez, be sure to go to the EBSQ Forum and check Challenge Central. Challenge Central is the place to check on current and past Simon Sez challenges – complete with all the entries, as well as all other EBSQ Challenges.

Congratulations Patricia! We look forward to your turn as Simon.

Like what you see here?  We hope you’ll consider leaving a comment or subscribing to one of our feeds. Never miss another cool post from EBSQ. Subscribe to EBSQ: Art Meets Blog v2.0 by Email today!

Join us tonight for Pastels with Kari Tirrell

hosted by EBSQ Self-Representing Artists and Kari Tirrell
Monday, July 13th at 9pm Eastern (6pm Pacific)
EBSQ Chat Room

Buzz and Baby - Kari Tirrell
Buzz and Baby - Kari Tirrell

Soft pastels are the purest form of painting material available. They are made from pure pigment, with just enough binder to form the pigment into a usable stick. I love their brilliance and intensity of color, but it is the immediacy of soft pastels that has made them my favorite medium. During my LIVE presentation, I will demonstrate my process of painting, step-by-step from start to finish.

About the presenter:
Kari Tirrell is a self-taught artist living in Gig Harbor, Washington.

Please Make a Note of the Time by your Zone:

Like what you see here?  We hope you’ll consider leaving a comment or subscribing to one of our feeds. Never miss another cool post from EBSQ. Subscribe to EBSQ: Art Meets Blog v2.0 by Email today!