EBSQ Bloggers of the Week: Tips for Blogging

This week, in lieu of the Blogger of the Week feature, we are taking a look back through our featured Bloggers and focusing on some of the tips they gave for successful art blogging. Most artists know by now that blogging can be extremely beneficial for marketing their art, but it can also be the biggest hurdle to overcome. We hope some of these top tips help!

Sweet by Kari TirrellKari Tirrell ~

1. Plan your blog posts with your audience (and search engines) in mind. One of the things I like best about blogging is that it makes the artist accessible.  I enjoy blogs where I can read the artist’s thoughts about what they’ve created, see their process, and interact with them through comments or email.  I assume that the readers of my blog are similarly interested, and try to write my blog posts accordingly.  It is also important to keep in mind that search engines need keywords.  If you want people to find your blog, include relevant keywords in your posts.  Simply posting a picture of your work with the title and dimensions is not only less satisfying for the viewer, it will also do very little to help the search engines find you.

2.  Follow the blogs of artists you admire, and leave thoughtful comments on their work.  The value of interacting with other artists is a benefit of blogging which should not be underestimated.

Fetch by Claudia RoulierClaudia Roulier ~

I would say that the single most important thing is to do it regularly. I had someone ask me last First Friday if I added content on a regular basis, I knew he was asking me was it worth his time to check in every so often. You need to keep it interesting and give people something to come back for. It’s a great way to show your new art. I really like showing point A to point Z during a project. Sometimes I feature things I see that are of interest  on other blogs (always ask permission first). Some of my content is about my dog who is a real character, I did a recent flyer featuring my dog. On my blog we can also add a snippet of a sentence or two to help entice people to swing in for a look. One time I was having the blues about my art and the short phrase I chose was “my art sucks”…boy did I get a lot of interesting  comments and a bunch of hits. Pictures are always good I use them almost every time I post. Try to be concise, sometimes you don’t need many words, people tend not to read long rambling posts. I try to mix it up, with tips and suggestions to just posting art. Spell check everything!

Geranium by Maria Soto RobbinsMaria Soto Robbins ~
1. Blog as frequently as you can. For me it’s at least three times a week, usually more. I do see the benefits of blogging frequently (via Google analytics) but sometimes I don’t have time to craft a complete post  and instead will just post a description of one of my paintings from one of my venues (Etsy or ebay), along with a picture.  This is still good for the seo however it is lazy approach and I don’t recommend you over do it. The point is to get something out there rather than go for days and days without posting anything on your blog!

2. I’d like to share, a simple list I glance at each time I blog. It consists of these basic, but important reminders (adapted from dailyblogtips.com):

1.  Did I read the post after writing it?  (You’d be amazed how many times, I’m in a hurry and forget to do this-lol.)
2. Is the post as complete as it could be?
3.  Did I research any related keywords?
4.  Did I think carefully about the title?
5.  Did I link to one or more of my older posts?
6. Did I link to external resources when appropriate?
7. Did I check to make sure my links are working?
8. Did I include an interesting image?
9. Is this a good day for traffic?
10. Did I proofread and check my spelling?

3. Besides these things though, the most important thing is to have a certain degree of passion about that which you blog about and have those feelings shine through to the reader. It’s a lot about your reader (not you necessarily) and what he hopes to find in your blog. They’re reading because you inspire them somehow!

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EBSQ Friday Five

The EBSQ Friday Five offers a brief look at noteworthy news from around the EBSQ Artist Blogosphere.

1. A Group of New Pieces – Polymer clay extraordinaire, Lauren Abrams Cole, shares her new, stunning creations with the world. Aren’t they beautiful!?

2. Pencil Sharpeners for Pastel Pencils – Artist Kari Tirrell offers an informative post on the pro’s and con’s of different, name brand sharpeners.

3. Mother’s Day Giveaway -EBSQ artist, Kimberly Anne Bailey, is having a giveaway for a custom pet portrait. You have till April 22nd to sign up!

4. Spring Sale – Sara Burrier is offering a wonderful deal on her prints if you sign up for her mailing list. Lovers of fantasy and whimsy shouldn’t miss this great deal!

5. Studio Tour – Vicki Miller is having a studio tour on April 14. Check her blog for details.

I hope everyone has a wonderful weekend!

EBSQ Spotlight on Still Life: Kari Tirrell

This month’s featured gallery is Still Life. A still life is a collection of inanimate objects depicted in an artistic composition and is a genre that has always been a staple for artists. Setting up a still life is an exercise in composition. Painting or photographing the composition is an exercise in technique. The result of these efforts is a work of art. Throughout the month of January, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of EBSQ’s still life artists.

Kari Tirrell

Sweet Things - Kari Tirrell

I find the still life genre intriguing for many reasons.  I like that I can open my refrigerator, utensil drawer, or cupboard and find something interesting to paint; any ordinary object can be made extraordinary.  I love still life paintings that show textures: metal, wood, glass, paper, cloth, etc., particularly if these textures are somehow layered.  I enjoy the play of light; the way it might bounce off of one object, but sink into another.  I like paintings that look uncontrived, with interesting viewpoints and crops.  The challenge of employing these elements to create a successful painting is what compels me to paint still life. – Kari Tirrell

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EBSQ Blogger of the Week: Kari Tirrell

Welcome to EBSQ’s first Blogger of the Week! I’m excited to start things off with an award winning, juried member of EBSQ. This self-taught pastel artist, with a love for realism, has been blogging since 2008. Her stunning creations never cease to amaze!

Who and where are you?

I’m Kari Tirrell, and I live in Gig Harbor, WA.

Sweet, 2009, Soft Pastel on La Carte

How did you get started art blogging?

Someone posted an article about why artists should blog on the EBSQ forum, and that started me thinking about it.  I didn’t want to blog.  I didn’t want to add another thing to my “to do” list.  But I did it anyway, and I’m glad I did.  I certainly didn’t expect to enjoy it so much.

New Hat, 2008, Soft Pastel on Velour Paper

Any tips for other EBSQ art bloggers?

1. Plan your blog posts with your audience (and search engines) in mind. One of the things I like best about blogging is that it makes the artist accessible.  I enjoy blogs where I can read the artist’s thoughts about what they’ve created, see their process, and interact with them through comments or email.  I assume that the readers of my blog are similarly interested, and try to write my blog posts accordingly.  It is also important to keep in mind that search engines need keywords.  If you want people to find your blog, include relevant keywords in your posts.  Simply posting a picture of your work with the title and dimensions is not only less satisfying for the viewer, it will also do very little to help the search engines find you.

2.  Follow the blogs of artists you admire, and leave thoughtful comments on their work.  The value of interacting with other artists is a benefit of blogging which should not be underestimated.

Lunch Break, 2009, Soft Pastels on Suede Matboard

What’s your musical inspiration of choice when you’re working in your studio?

My taste in music is somewhat eclectic, and I listen to whatever strikes my mood at the moment.  I have satellite radio in my studio now, which I’m really enjoying because I can listen to a wide variety of music.  When I want my old favorites, I pull out my MP3.

Sunny Spot, 2009, Soft Pastels on Suede Matboard

What’s coming next from your easel?

I have my next ten paintings planned; mostly figurative works, but I’m going to throw a couple of other things into the mix as well.  Visit my blog to find out!

http://karitirrell.blogspot.com/

Thank you Kari for the being the first EBSQ Blogger of the Week!

If you are an EBSQ Artist and would like to be considered for Blogger of the Week just add us to your blogroll. I’m searching EBSQ profiles weekly for links to artist’s blogs. If you aren’t an EBSQ Artist, what are you waiting for?

Join Today!

Join us tonight for Pastels with Kari Tirrell

hosted by EBSQ Self-Representing Artists and Kari Tirrell
Monday, July 13th at 9pm Eastern (6pm Pacific)
EBSQ Chat Room

Buzz and Baby - Kari Tirrell
Buzz and Baby - Kari Tirrell

Soft pastels are the purest form of painting material available. They are made from pure pigment, with just enough binder to form the pigment into a usable stick. I love their brilliance and intensity of color, but it is the immediacy of soft pastels that has made them my favorite medium. During my LIVE presentation, I will demonstrate my process of painting, step-by-step from start to finish.

About the presenter:
Kari Tirrell is a self-taught artist living in Gig Harbor, Washington.

Please Make a Note of the Time by your Zone:

Like what you see here?  We hope you’ll consider leaving a comment or subscribing to one of our feeds. Never miss another cool post from EBSQ. Subscribe to EBSQ: Art Meets Blog v2.0 by Email today!

This month’s EBSQ Live: Pastels

hosted by EBSQ Self-Representing Artists and Kari Tirrell
Monday, July 13th at 9pm Eastern (6pm Pacific)
EBSQ Chat Room

Buzz and Baby - Kari Tirrell
Buzz and Baby - Kari Tirrell

Soft pastels are the purest form of painting material available. They are made from pure pigment, with just enough binder to form the pigment into a usable stick. I love their brilliance and intensity of color, but it is the immediacy of soft pastels that has made them my favorite medium. During my LIVE presentation, I will demonstrate my process of painting, step-by-step from start to finish.

About the presenter:
Kari Tirrell is a self-taught artist living in Gig Harbor, Washington.

Please Make a Note of the Time by your Zone:

Like what you see here?  We hope you’ll consider leaving a comment or subscribing to one of our feeds. Never miss another cool post from EBSQ. Subscribe to EBSQ: Art Meets Blog v2.0 by Email today!