EBSQ Art Seen and Blogged in November

Today’s post is a celebration of art created in November by EBSQ artists who are also dedicated bloggers. Mind you, this is only a sample of the amazing art I’ve seen. I invite you to explore more from our gifted artists:

http://www.ebsqart.com/Artists/

   

 

 

 

 

Artist Featured: Kimberly Vanlandingham, Sherry Key, Gretchen Del Rio, Diane Whitehead, Patience, Marcia Baldwin, Karen Winters, Mark Satchwill, Sandra Willard, Torrie Smiley, Christine Striemer, Dia Spriggs, Carmen Medlin, Michele Lynch, Carol DeMumbrum.

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EBSQ 1:1 with Caroline Baker

Who and where are you?

I’m Caroline Baker. Sometimes I include my maiden name, Lassovszky because it’s unique – only my parents and brother share this name in the U.S., though sometimes I realize it might be too long a string of letters for anyone to remember. I grew up in the suburbs outside of Washington, D.C., both on the Maryland and Virginia sides of the beltway, though at this point I have spent more of my years in far Southwestern Virginia, which is a very different environment. I started my undergraduate art degree in Radford, Virginia, also started a family and then moved even farther southwest to just outside the town of Pound, Virginia. I was able to complete my degree at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise in 2000. The visual art major had just become available there, so it contrasted in many ways with what I experienced in the more established art department at Radford. After working several graphic design jobs and doing drafting with a small local civil engineering business, I got a Master’s degree in education and taught art in public schools grades K-12 for several years. I have come full circle as I am currently teaching visual arts courses at U.V.A. Wise.

Can you tell us how you combined textile arts with your oil painting?

I have enjoyed working with paint for as long as I can remember. I suppose I was in high school when I started playing around with dyes. I was really just experimenting with the drugstore Rit dyes, making t-shirts for friends and so forth. I was introduced to the fiber reactive MX dyes through a surface design class at Radford and continued to just play with them as a side project separated from painting. When I started stretching my own canvases, the idea that canvas did not necessarily have to remain a two-dimensional object throughout my process interested me, and I liked the aspects akin to watercolor involved in simply staining the canvas with the dyes as a sort of underpainting before stretching the canvas and working with it as an oil painting.

 

I also find the idea of the support/ground matrix intriguing as this object that changes character so drastically once it is prepared to become a painting, the fact that paintings on canvas began their existence as a textile object, something more associated with craft than the idea of “Art” tied to the description of a painting as “oil on canvas”. There is an element of a cycle of deconstruction/reconstruction involved in processing the canvas to remove sizing and folding it into a three-dimensional object or sewing it only to take it apart and flatten it later. All of the things I do in the beginning of my process are tied to the object as a textile, where as the later stages – stretching, priming, sometimes sanding and going through adding passages in paint involve characteristics of the object as support/ground, which feels very different to me, as though I am enabling and directing this metamorphosis. Recently I began to see parallels in this process with what I observe in the management of the land around me through coal extraction and worked through a series of landscape paintings based on those observations. For instance, the winery and a local site used a a flea market interested me because of the reuse of the land in the continuing cycle heavily influenced and accelerated for good or bad by human intervention. As of late I have found myself moving back in the direction of lyrical abstraction and linking this to my feelings regarding a specific sense of place.

How long does it take you from start to finish to complete one of your canvas dyed paintings?

A lot of times it depends on how much work I need to put into the beginning part of the process and what techniques I decide to use as well as the results with the dyes. If I bind the canvas using a lot of sewing, it takes quite a bit longer. At this point I am relatively sure of the results I will get from the dye stage, but sometimes the results are not what I need and I set it aside for another idea that aligns with the resulting “underpainting” better and start over with a new piece of canvas. Sometimes I continue working with the same canvas by folding or binding again and over dyeing, or using discharge techniques to remove some dye. The minimum amount of time I have spent on a piece like this is three days including time for the wet, dyed canvas to dry, heat setting if I choose to, rinsing, stretching and priming. Many times it depends on how much I want to meld the results of the dye techniques with the painting. I like the idea that both processes become so integrated in the final product that the viewer would need to look for where one is more prominent than the other or the two dovetail. I tend to spend a lot of time working with layering glazes when I paint so that there are areas where both processes work well together and coexist easily on the canvas, though sometimes a piece will call for bringing attention to the contrasting natures of the processes and media as well.

What’s coming next from your studio?

Some of the surface design techniques involved with the dyes lend themselves to repetition and symmetry, and I want to use those qualities in conjunction with the idea that seems to be becoming prevalent in our information-saturated culture that if you repeat something enough times and in the right places, they necessarily become the truth whether they began that way or not, and how subtle shifts in the way things are repeated reinforce or change that perception of something as fact. I want to work with minimization and regulation in the way I work with potentially repeating shapes and forms that result from my process without losing the expressive qualities I think are also important in dealing with cultural content. I plan to return to square format at a larger scale, but I have some ideas for series of things at a small or miniature scale as well.

Thank you Caroline for sharing your process and your art with us today!

Want more? Follow Caroline and her art here:

http://ilex9.ebsqart.com/

http://www.facebook.com/CarolineHBakerFineArt

EBSQ Facebook Artist of the Week: So Jeo LeBlond

Who and where are you?

My name is So Jeo LeBlond and I am a Pysanky / Batik Egg artist living in Nova
Scotia Canada. I use the traditional Ukrainian technique of decorating real
blown eggshells using a writing instrument called a kistka to write designs on
the shells with hot melted beeswax and then color them using dyes. I enjoy
taking traditional and non-traditional elements and producing my own unique
creations.

How were you introduced to Facebook?

I first started using Facebook like so many others as a personal page, using it
as a social platform to keep in touch with friends and family. In 2010, I
created my Facebook Page to display my artwork. I realized that it was the
perfect platform to advertise my artwork and it’s free!

Any tips for other artists starting a Facebook Page?

My tip for other artists starting a Facebook Page is say you want to post a
photo of a new piece to several different groups, post one photo only and then
share that photo to the groups. This way whenever someone clicks on your
photo, it will bring them back to your page.

What’s your favorite Facebook Page feature?

I love that I can incorporate all the individual web services that I use into
one place. It’s like having a second website, as it incorporates my Etsy
store, eBay auctions, Zazzle products and Flickr photos. I also love that it is
so easy to share information and photos of my artwork, plus my posts reach so
many others that might not necessarily come across my work otherwise.

What’s coming next from your studio?

This year I would like to increase my jewelry line, creating more designs,
styles and increasing my clientele.

EBSQ September Online Exhibits

Voting is underway in our August online exhibits: Cats & Dogs, FOTM: Prairie Plants, and Plein Air: Water. Members of EBSQ have until tomorrow, 9/8, to vote for their favorite artwork in each show. Go show your support for our artists!

Entries are now open for September’s exhibits:

 

 

 

The deadline for entering a September exhibit is 9/30/2012. I’ll be entering the Autumn exhibit. Which exhibit is on your radar?

Interview with Mark Satchwill: Going Digital

EBSQ’s Mark Satchwill has long been known for his watercolor paintings, particularly his portraits of amazing accuracy and depth. Over the last year, Mark has taken those skills and applied them digital painting. I had a virtual sit-down with Mark to discuss this transition, his challenges and passion.

Can you tell us how and why you ventured into digital painting?

There were a few factors involved. One was simple curiosity – I was seeing a lot of digital art around and wanted to try it. I was also doing regular illustration work and had ended up with a big pile of drawings that were just taking up space – I figured if I began to do that work digitally it would save on space and materials! I also felt I needed a new challenge, something new to learn. So, I bought a drawing tablet and then did some research to decide which art software to buy (I bought Painter, ArtRage and Manga Studio), then set about learning to use them!

What have you found most challenging when working in digital?

I think the hardest thing was learning to use a tablet and pen. It’s almost like learning to draw again, as instead of looking down at your hand on the paper as you draw you, your hand is drawing on the tablet and you are looking at what you’re drawing on the screen – so there is a disconnection that takes some getting used to. I think the other challenge is to retain your own artistic personality and style. So much digital art has a rather generic look to it, it’s lacking that stamp of personality that traditional has but I think coming to digital with good traditional skills makes a big difference in your approach.

  

For you, what is the biggest difference when using digital vs. traditional tools?

I think it’s the freedom digital allows. As I don’t have to think about buying new materials or wasting materials I can be free to be more experimental. I’m free do much larger work as I don’t have to worry about space. Thanks to working with layers if I paint something and it doesn’t work or I mess it up I can just delete it rather than have to start the whole image again from scratch. And there’s no mess or tools to clean up!

Have you encountered any issues selling digital art compared to traditional?

Yes. I think there are a couple of reasons. One is that if you purchase a digital artwork you purchase it as a file or a print, so that feeling of buying a physical object that someone has created isn’t there. I think people will gradually come around to the idea though. The other reason, relating to my own work, is that people have got to know me for traditional watercolour work and are less receptive to my digital work. I think there is mistrust from many traditional artists about digital – they think that it’s trickery and that it’s somehow easier and needs less skills, that it’s sort of cheating. Of course there are tools that can be used to cut corners if you want to but if you don’t have the basic traditional skills they will only take you so far. Ultimately digital is just another medium and it’s the end result itself which is most important. I’ve barely scratched the surface of what’s possible and I’m loving working digitally. It doesn’t mean I will totally give up working traditionally – there is plenty of room for both!

http://marksatchwill.ebsqart.com
http://marksatchwill.blogspot.com/
Mark Satchwill Art on Facebook

EBSQ Friday Five

1. Dolphin Daze by Fawn McNeill – Gorgeous and serene! Do you see the dolphins? Take a closer look on Fawn’s blog.

2. Sunflower Art Tote Giveaway – Maria Soto Robbins is having a giveaway for a lovely tote bag featuring her sunflower painting. Check her blog for details!

3. Japanese Artist Yajoi Kusama – Miriam Schulman has a guest blogger featuring a polka dot Japanese artist. Yes, you read that right. I wouldn’t share it here if it weren’t worthy!!

4. Selling Art on Pinterest – If there’s a will, there’s a way. Delilah Smith has some tips for hooking buyers via Pinterest.

5. Do you have a blog post that’s news worthy? Contact me at amanda[at]ebsqart[dot]com.

Have a creative weekend!

EBSQ Friday Five

1. Some like it Hot – I can almost feel the heat in Alice Harpel’s new painting! Take a look at her blog for this and others in her “show box” series.

2. Top Six London Art Adventures – When the Olympics are over there’s still plenty to see. Miriam Schulman has a schedule on her blog.

3. Better Homes and Garden Holiday Crafts Fall – Our very own Janell Berryman was featured in the Better Homes and Garden magazine! Congratulations, Janell.

4. FAQs – Natalia Pierandrei recently posted some FAQs on her blog. I think this is a must for every artist.

5. Volunteering at Northville Art House – Took Gallagher shares her day volunteering at Northville Art House. Great images and commentary!

Have a great weekend!