EBSQ Spotlight on Portraits & Figurative Art: Theresa Bayer

This month’s featured gallery is Portraits & Figurative Art. Portraits are the artistic representation of an individual or individuals with the face as the focus. The term “figurative art” most frequently refers to the representational depiction of a human or animal figure. Often they are deeply personal – either to the artist, because of the emotions being expressed by the subject or because of the emotions these works elicit from us. They delight, disturb and connect us. During the month of May, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ artists that create some of these evocative pieces of art.

Theresa Bayer

Wisdom Incorporated - Theresa Bayer

My paintings feature dreamlike scenes of mysterious people, animals, and landscapes and have a storybook quality to them. Symbols inspire me, because they compress complex ideas and philosophies into immediately accessible images. I love portraying the figure and seeing how many different ways it can fit into a fantastic scene. I attend figure drawing and figure painting sessions to get a fix on the realism, and then invent surroundings. – Theresa Bayer

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EBSQ Spotlight on Portraits & Figurative Art: Pat DeVane Burns

This month’s featured gallery is Portraits & Figurative Art. Portraits are the artistic representation of an individual or individuals with the face as the focus. The term “figurative art” most frequently refers to the representational depiction of a human or animal figure. Often they are deeply personal – either to the artist, because of the emotions being expressed by the subject or because of the emotions these works elicit from us. They delight, disturb and connect us. During the month of May, we are going to take a few moments to catch up with some of the EBSQ artists that create some of these evocative pieces of art.

Pat DeVane Burns

One Down, Two To Go - Pat DeVane Burns

What is so intriguing to me about forms and faces, be it person or animal, is that each one is an individual… alike in so many ways, but different.  It is my challenge as the artist to see what is unique about the body language, the nuance of expression, the coloration, the personality and to translate what might be considered intangible into a tangible painting of that individual. – Pat DeVane Burns

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EBSQ Spotlight on Fibre Art: Wendy L. Feldmann

This month’s featured gallery is Fibre Art. The fibre arts involve creating art with fibre. It sounds neat and simple, but the fibre arts are so varied that it is like saying that there are fish in the sea; it’s hardly an adequate description. Fibre art includes spinning and weaving. Also quilting and collage. It encompasses sculpture and apparel and felting and more. Fibre art is any piece of art made with fibre and it’s application is almost endless.

Wendy L. Feldmann

Quilted Guild ID Tag - Wendy L. Feldmann
Quilted Guild ID Tag - Wendy L. Feldmann

I’ve been interested in all sorts of fibre arts ever since I was a little kid. I remember making a whole collection of soft-sculpture critters that I played with for hours on end. Endlessly fascinated with crochet and my Mattel Knit Magic, I would save my allowance to purchase one more skein of yarn…

When I was rather young, my mom tried to teach me to sew on a sewing machine, maybe before I was ready. I remember her admonishing me that Things Needed To Be Hemmed, and the idea really bugged me. Maybe that really stuck with me – maybe that’s why I love the free-motion/collage-style quilting that I’ve developed. There are no edges to be turned under. It’s just layers of fabric, used to like paint, to create images.

Some of my earliest creations were crocheted outfits invented for my stuffed rabbit companion. Over the years I’ve found myself knitting with lots of colors (inspired by Kaffe Fassett in the late 80’s), weaving on a floor loom (my BFA focused on Weaving), batiking, embroidering, tie-dying, macrame-ing, designing and creating stuffed animals, dying fabrics and fibers, quilting, crocheting cat beds, and currently I’m needle-felting.

I’m a Color-and-Texture junkie. I heed my Inner Magpie. I love things that sparkle, and I dearly love color – lots of it. Some of my favorite moments are spent lost in a yarn store or a fabric store. Or wandering in a thrift store, entranced by the rows of color and texture.

Other art forms fascinate me. I love to create illustrations, to paint things with what I think of as my “Gypsy-Caravan Style”, and I am a professional Henna Artist. But I always seem to come back around to Fiber Arts.

The common thread…? (er, fiber?): I’m fascinated with transforming yarn or fabric. Usually into something brightly colored.  – Wendy L. Feldmann

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EBSQ Spotlight on Fibre Art: Tina Marie Ferguson

This month’s featured gallery is Fibre Art. The fibre arts involve creating art with fibre. It sounds neat and simple, but the fibre arts are so varied that it is like saying that there are fish in the sea; it’s hardly an adequate description. Fibre art includes spinning and weaving. Also quilting and collage. It encompasses sculpture and apparel and felting and more. Fibre art is any piece of art made with fibre and it’s application is almost endless.

Tina Marie Ferguson

Joey Roo - Tina Marie Ferguson
Joey Roo - Tina Marie Ferguson

As an artist, I enjoy experimenting with a multitude of various art forms and the means and methods of creating.  I remember my grandmother designing beautiful quilts from scraps of cloth and old clothing.  I always considered what she did to be a true art form.  Now, as a mature 44 year old, the art forms that I find most appealing are the ones in which I received no formal training.  I guess that makes fibre art a true form of folk art for me.  I find inspiration in the designs, patterns, and textures of fabric remnants, discarded clothing, and upholstery samples.  Socks and gloves especially fascinate me.  They speak to me.  They all want to be something else and I feel compelled to fulfill that desire.  Each piece is an original.  I believe that stuffies hold a mass appeal that other more traditional art forms do not.  People connect more literally with a piece of fibre art. – Tina Marie Ferguson

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This week – Simon Sez: Fur!

This week’s Simon Sez theme is fur. Stephanie D’Aigle is Simon this week and this is what she says regarding her decree: “Your job this week it to make my heart melt and show me some fur.  The fur can be anything.  I just love me some fur.  OK, not all critters have fur do they!  My MinPins would laugh at me if I called their hair fur. Yet they still qualify! Be it domestic or wild, a drawing or painting or photograph or what have you. I wanna see some fur please!  Unlimited entries, knock me out!”

As usual you have until 11:59 Sunday night to submit your entry. This week Sunday is February 15th .

Joseph J. Callahan
Joseph J. Callahan

All Simon Sez challenges are open to everyone. To enter Simon Sez: Fur! and to see  more than just the above entry,  simply go to the EBSQ Forum, find Member Groups, Challenges & General Art Discussions and then go to Challenge Central. All the challenges past and present – including Simon Sez, can be found there.

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